UN Global Compact  |  CEO Water Mandate

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Different types of partners and stakeholders need different forms of engagement. Partners differ in their level of involvement – are they a core partner, a secondary partner, or a benefactor? Partner type also affects engagement strategies, whether the partner belongs ...

Any action that involves water creates the most benefit and impact for society, environment and economy if these factors are considered: Stewardship, conservation, sustainability, responsibility, long-termism, responsible investing, stakeholder versus shareholder value. In 2010, the United Nations General Assembly recognized ...

Depending on the project context, a water stewardship project may require specific technical skills beyond the skills already held by project partners. This is especially likely if the project falls outside the traditional realm of typical water resources management familiar ...

A strong partnership based on trust is important for project implementation and sustained success. Fostering local ownership and support for the partnership creates trust amongst project proponents and beneficiaries. A resilient, trust-based partnership can better address any challenges that arise ...

Partner dependency causes the outcome of a partnership to rest on a single institution, threatening the long-term sustainability of the initiative. Programmes should be designed from a systemic perspective that includes multiple strategic partners. At a practical design level, the ...

Clearly define roles for each member of the partnership to ensure stakeholders and partners do not get confused regarding the partnership process. Roles are best defined through both verbal confirmation during stakeholder workshops and the written partnership memorandum of understanding.

Os projetos de Captação de Água Pluvial da Rede Engenheiros sem Fronteiras encontram sua maior dificuldade na aquisição do material para construção dos módulos. Uma vez que somos uma Organização Social e não temos lucro, precisamos buscar outros meios de ...

Consider a balance of different funding sources when initiating and maintaining projects. Admittedly, without confirmed funding, it may be difficult to convince partners to come on board. However, the type and distribution of funding can impact the longer-term sustainability and ...

Partnerships can be seen as short-term catalysts for the establishment of long-term water stewardship institutions. Often, partnerships begin when stakeholders affected by water issues in a catchment or site decide to work together to address risks, threats, and opportunities. Upon ...

Task force teams are bound by a common goal (e.g. water security) but each member tackles different components of the solution, such as land management, education, or infrastructure provision.

Designing the long-term viability of the partnership beyond initial funding requires specific investment in partnership development. This long-term focus is as important as achieving the project objectives. When designing the start of the partnership, envision how the organisation will sustain ...

Water stewardship goes beyond technical interventions. Stewardship partners must consider the capacity building of other skills including social, or “soft,” skills, especially in the context of complex water challenges. Soft skills include communication, partnership brokering, negotiation, and facilitation. These soft ...

Social and economic issues are often connected to environmental challenges. To engage the right partners, funding sources, and project strategy, understand the potential broad impacts of your project before designing any partnership. Win support from key stakeholders by framing water ...

Communication is an essential part of any project. Good communication with stakeholders and beneficiaries raises awareness as to why a project is necessary and beneficial. Clear communication can also generate local ownership for the future of the project and the ...

Financial instability poses a major challenge for many medium-term and long-term water stewardship partnerships. This instability should be mediated by seeking funding outside grant-making or donations – such as through partner contributions or revenue generating activities – and utilizing volunteers ...

High-level engagement with policy makers and government officials is necessary to ensure the partnership activities are aligned with public mandates, particularly the public sector mandate for water security.

In-depth and considered consultation with key stakeholders will lead to a better partnership and meaningful solutions to local water challenges. Focused consultations with stakeholders and prospective partners can help identify the main local water challenges that impact them and validate ...

To create local ownership of projects or partnerships, understand the needs of related stakeholders and beneficiaries. Beneficiaries might include local businesses, communities living near the project, local or national government, and indirectly all stakeholders whose livelihoods depend on the outcome ...

Focus on the longer-term outcomes needed, like behaviour change or new livelihoods, not just outputs like infrastructure or training. Even well-designed projects may encounter previously unseen challenges or opportunities and will require a flexible approach. A project or partnership that ...

Conceptualizing the project approach is very important at the start of the project scoping phase. This is particularly true when considering what implementation approach will best deliver the outcomes of the proposed project. Implementation choices largely depend on the approach ...

Millions of people globally do not have ready access to running water at their homes. They are forced to walk 6 – 10 miles carrying heavy (47 lb. – 21Kgs) water containers daily. The cost of having water delivered is ...

Partnerships and projects grow or change over time, often becoming more complex than the original partners anticipated. Therefore partners should maintain flexibility for the project to change or expand during the execution of the partnership. Governance agreements should allow for ...

The long-term vision of a partnership may get forgotten in the day-to-day delivery of individual projects. To deliver lasting impact on the ground, focus on the partnership’s overarching goals and ensure that each activity (whether it is a baseline study ...

A pilot, or short demonstration of the project approach before it is implemented in full, can help to build confidence in the competence and capacity of the partnership. A pilot can also serve as an example on the ground to ...

Many stakeholders will need education on water resources management and stewardship, especially those not exposed to such concepts before. This training and awareness-raising helps stakeholders engage with water sustainability to enact long-term, comprehensive solutions.

Developing partner capacity through education ensures partnerships are formed on an equal and sustainable footing. Training is a way to build partners’ capacity and understanding so that all partners can engage equally to address the water challenges that most affect ...

A dedicated person in charge of planning and executing the project is a benefit when communicating between partners, as one person (and team) stays responsible for the work at all stages.

Regular monitoring and progress evaluation is necessary to determine the final outcome of a project. This monitoring must occur during the project so that focal areas can be changed if necessary, as well as upon project completion to evaluate its ...

Partnerships should set objectives that are transparent, objectively measurable, and can be tracked over time. Setting measurable goals helps to create and sustain momentum throughout the partnership by allowing partners to demonstrate progress while holding stakeholders accountable. Through good monitoring ...

Having multiple essential partners provides a stronger foundation for lasting action on shared water-related challenges to achieve your desired partnership outcomes. This “critical mass” of partners helps to represent different stakeholder requirements (depending on the water challenges identified) and share ...

Before designing any project, understand how your local river and groundwater catchments are connected (or not) and how they feed local water supplies or ecosystems. Baseline condition data will inform a feasibility study on the project approach.